Posts Tagged ‘Dianetics’

New Humanist writer has pretty dim view of Hubbard’s Scientology … and religion in general.

Written by Editor on . Posted in Cult of Scientology

"I would say that 99 per cent of what my father has written about his own life is false." --- L. Ron Hubbard Jr.

Some interesting observations by Michael Bywater at the New Humanist, Ideas for Godless People.
My conclusion is that it’s L Ron. Not just his keenness on the business aspects of religion. Not just the thorough nastiness of some of his administrative bruisers. Not just the allegations of black ops and dodgy dealings or the notorious hair-trigger litigiousness of the organisation (it’s so litigious it’ll probably sue me for calling it so litigious it’ll probably sue me). Nor even L Ron’s history as a civil engineer, a pretty flaky WW2 military career (kicking off a two-day battle involving his own submarine-chaser, four other ships, two blimps but no actual enemy submarine) or his tall stories about geology, Freud, atomic physics (he failed), being a lama, exploring, documentaries and the rest. No; my theory is it’s L Ron. I mean, literally, “L Ron”. Jesus: fine. Muhammad: fine. Moses: tickety-boo. Peace be upon them all. But L Ron? Excuse me? If its founder had been “L Ron Christ” would Christianity ever have got going? It’s a harsh world and I think the answer is “no”.But as for why Scientology did get going … well: first, Dianetics hits the perfect pitch of laying out mumbo-jumbo in just clear enough terms for people who think they’re terribly significant but who aren’t that bright (there are a lot of movie stars in the lists, wouldn’t you say?) to think that they’re grasping something terribly important which actually makes sense. And, secondly, it doesn’t pose a Creator. Just a bunch of clever aliens. Whom we can turn back into if we have enough money.Brilliant.Apotheosis without the Theos. Only a science fiction writer could come up with that idea. A religion. It’s got to be better than a poxy old New York Times bestseller. Ask any Thetan.
Inside the mind of Scientology’s Messiah.
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Investigators go inside a Scientology Org in London … video cameras record the cult secrets

Written by Editor on . Posted in Cult of Scientology

Scientology & the “Barnum & Bailey” religious 3-ring circus that is Hollywood

Written by Editor on . Posted in Cult of Scientology, Entertainment, Religion

Scientology … perhaps the biggest “act” of them all?
Space denies us a full accounting of L. Ron Hubbard's paramount scam in this space ... others have done a much nicer job elsewhere. Let's just say that this is one of the great con men of the 20th century.

For more comprehensive accounting of L. Ron Hubbard's paramount scam, visit some of the links presented at the end of this post. This is truly one of the great con men of the 20th century.

Before L. Ron Hubbard wrote Dianetics, according to the memoirs of several of his old muckers in science fiction, he told them that the way to make real money would be to start a religion. He went on to invent Scientology, then took it to its natural heartland, Los Angeles, where the Church of Scientology’s luxurious Celebrity Centre caters to the very particular needs of the famous.Right from the start, he directed his underlings to target the stars. So sneer as you might at Scientology’s mix of banal self-help techniques, comic-book mythology about invading aliens and bizarre layers of secrecy, there is no denying that time has proved Hubbard to be, in one way or another, a true visionary.Hubbard could have just been following the money. Actors can be paid as much as $US20 million for making a single film; you could reasonably expect that an effective marketing campaign would find at least a few both able and willing to pay the $US360,000 it reportedly costs to reach Scientology’s innermost sanctum of understanding. But, in fact, it wasn’t just a matter of finding clusters of people with startling amounts of money who were less likely to be hard-headed than, say, bankers about how they spent it. Even if they didn’t pay anything, they would be worth the effort.Because Hubbard and his followers clearly recognised that if you want to reach hearts and minds out there in the world, you cannot do better than have a sprinkling of celebrities to carry the message. Nobody knows how many Scientologists there are, but their starry list of known acolytes includes Will and Jada Pinkett Smith, Kirstie Alley, Jenna Elfman, Giovanni Ribisi and any number of others.
Although Dianetics didn’t really start out as “religious,” Hubbard realized that from a business point of view, it would suffer less scrutiny from any who might be critical of its claims if were a “sacred” endeavor … not to mention the obvious tax benefits. Those beautiful TAX BENEFITS!
Nobody knows how many Scientologists there are, but their starry list of known acolytes includes Will and Jada Pinkett Smith, Kirstie Alley, Jenna Elfman, Giovanni Ribisi and any number of others.
And don’t we know about Smith’s adament rejections about that … “I Am Legend,” but “I’m NOT a Scientologist.”
But while it is clear enough why marginal religions need the stars, why the stars are so susceptible to them is more mysterious. In a country where 81 per cent of the population identifies with a specific religion, the entertainment industry has always been notably agnostic.Fifty years after Scientology found a home in Hollywood, a secularised version of the Jewish mystical cult of Kabbalah has become the spiritual choice de nos jours; adherents range from Demi Moore to Gwyneth Paltrow.The explanation for this religious frailty may lie in the nature of acting as much as the shared characteristics of people who do it. Actors, it is often noted, are generally insecure.
But, you are asking, how can people “buy in” to these wacky circus acts? Ahah … thus comes the secret to religious hucksterism:
Although the Church’s spiritual headquarters are in Clearwater, Florida, Scientology is most deeply associated with Los Angeles and its entertainment industry.

Although the Church’s spiritual headquarters are in Clearwater, Florida, Scientology is most deeply associated with Los Angeles and its entertainment industry.

Both Scientology and Kabbalah are career-positive: being in the right mental place, they suggest, is crucial to the commercial success that is the sole measure of worth on the Hollywood scale. “Why is Kabbalah suddenly so attractive for artists of various domains, you may wonder?” writes the entertainment editor on the Softpedia website. “The answer is pretty simple: because it promotes physical welfare and wellness, because the ‘divine system of wisdom’ is primarily based on the principle that the ‘Creator wants you to have everything you want’: that is, money, good relationships, love and happiness. What more could one man ask from his petty existence on Earth?”
And as we dig down into the “what makes people tick” department, this author reveals even more of the “secret lives of the Dumb & Dumber:”
The caricature of celebrity-friendly religions, of course, is that they are long on consolation and short on anything else, such as uncongenial moral codes or an actual God whose own celebrity, celeb-watching snarks suggest, might occasionally overshadow the star’s own. This may be part of the appeal of Buddhism, however vaguely understood it may be by many Westerners who flirt with it. Anyone can latch on to ideas of individual spiritual growth and the pursuit of physical and mental well-being. After all, it sounds a lot like therapy. Everyone in Hollywood understands that.
But like I’ve said a thousand times before (and you would too, being the honest intellectual that you are), JUST FOLLOW THE MONEY (and in this case the BOX OFFICE):
Big stacks of money are motivation enough for Hollywood types to buy into the next "Big Thing." Don't have enough for a really good PR agent? Join a wacky religion!

Don't have enough for a really good PR agent? Join a wacky religion!

But in the middle of the movie industry, with its naked adulation of success and money, its emphasis on surface gloss and a competitive ethos that some say makes everyone else implicitly untrustworthy, the longing for a refuge from “the infectious malaise of secular life”, as Daphne Merkin puts it, must be proportionately greater. And if it comes with “an up-to-the-microsecond sense of branding” and excellent merchandise, so much the better. After all, however much those celebrities might be looking for a haven, they’re still in Hollywood.
RELATED RESOURCES: Ground Zero for all things Anti-Scientology Church of Scientology: A Religious Mafia? A Critical Examination of the Goal of the Church of Scientology Is Scientology Compatible With Christianity? Scientology, Free Speech and “Religious Persecution” Hubbard’s Religion The Ultimate Spin Doctor: L. Ron Hubbard – The Man and His Myth Tom Cruise and Scientology Château Scientology: Inside the Church’s Celebrity Centre That’s a wrap!